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Health News Results - 21

Many Health Care Workers Who Have Coronavirus Don't Have Symptoms: Study

Four in 10 health care workers who test positive for COVID-19 don't have symptoms, which means they could unknowingly spread the disease to co-workers and patients, researchers say.

For the new study, the research team reviewed 97 studies that included more than 230,000 health care workers in 24 countries. Rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection among the health care workers ranged from 7% ...

Even With PPE, Risk of COVID-19 Still High for Frontline Workers

At the peak of the pandemic in the United States and United Kingdom, frontline health care workers, especially minorities, had much higher risks for COVID-19 than other individuals, a new study finds.

Paramedics, who are often the first to see sick patients, are at far greater risk of testing positive for COVID-19 than others, the researchers said. That's especially true for frontlin...

'Aerosol Boxes' Meant to Protect COVID Health Teams Might Harm Them: Study

Aerosol boxes meant to protect health care workers when they intubate COVID-19 patients may actually increase their exposure to airborne virus particles, an Australian study warns.

Intubation is done when patients are placed on a ventilator.

Aerosol boxes have been touted as a quick, simple way to protect workers, but their effectiveness and safety were never clinically test...

Major Medical Groups Urge Americans to Wear Face Masks

Three major medical groups are urging Americans to wear face masks, wash their hands and practice social distancing as coronavirus cases continue to surge in the United States.

In an open letter to the public released Monday, the groups noted that stay-at-home orders and other social distancing policies curbed the spread of COVID-19 in the spring.

"But in the weeks since st...

After Heart Attack, Home Care Can Prevent a Return to Hospital

Receiving home health care reduces heart attack survivors' risk of hospital readmission after discharge, a new study finds.

In the United States, only a small percentage of heart attack survivors receive home care such as nursing and physical therapy, according to study authors.

The findings were presented recently at a virtual American Heart Association meeting. Research p...

Most Workers Report for Duty With Flu-Like Symptoms, Global Survey Shows

Most people around the world say they would continue to work if they had flu-like symptoms, an online survey finds.

In the face of the coronavirus pandemic, researchers called the findings disturbing.

The survey -- conducted online between October 2018 and January 2019, before the emergence of COVID-19 -- included responses from 533 workers in 49 countries. Respondents inclu...

PTSD May Plague Nurses, Especially in COVID-19 Era

Nursing is not a profession for the fainthearted, but new research shows that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can strike nurses, and suggests the new coronavirus may make things even worse for those on the front lines of the pandemic.

Though the study was conducted a year ago, the results are particularly timely as nurses around the world are treating millions of COVID-19 cases ...

Sleep Troubles Hit Health Care Workers During Pandemic

Many health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic are struggling with sleep, a new study finds.

The researchers also found that those with insomnia were more likely to have depression, anxiety and stress-based trauma.

The study included nearly 1,600 health care workers who completed an online questionnaire between January 29 and February 3 at the peak o...

ER Workers' Stress May Affect Patient Care: Study

The COVID-19 pandemic has added to already high stress levels in emergency rooms, a social psychologist says.

"ER providers are on the front line of this pandemic, and stress, anxiety and anger are increasing," said Linda Isbell, a professor of psychology at University of Massachusetts Amherst.

"As we all face anxiety about the fallout of this pandemic, anger about a healt...

'Eye of the Storm:' U.S. Nurses Already Facing Extreme Stress Over Coronavirus

"I have worked the last four days, and I have cried every day."

Eileen McStay, a registered nurse at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, is on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, and it is mentally and emotionally wearing her and her colleagues down.

McStay works on a hospital floor filled with nothing but lonely, scared coronavirus patients, some of whom are fi...

It's Not Medical Outcomes That Drive Patients' Hospital Reviews

Rave online reviews about a hospital stay may not mean much about the actual medical care there, if a new study is any indication.

Researchers found that across U.S. hospitals, patient-satisfaction scores were more dependent on "hospitality" factors -- like friendly nurses, quiet rooms and good food -- than on hard measures of health care quality.

Nurses May Need Suicide-Prevention Screening

Nurses are at elevated risk for suicide, but the issue gets little attention, researchers report.

Their study of 2005-2016 U.S. government data found the suicide rate among female nurses was significantly higher (10 per 100,000) than that of the general female population (7 per 100,000). The rate among male nurses (33 per 100,000) was also higher than in the general male population (2...

Sleepy Nurses Could Put Patients at Risk

Nurses get less sleep before their scheduled shifts compared to nonwork days, which could affect patient care, according to a new study.

How much less sleep? Almost an hour and a half.

"Nurses are sleeping, on average, less than recommended amounts prior to work, which may have an impact on their health and performance on the job," said study lead author Amy Witkoski Stimpfe...

Are Disinfectants Putting Nurses at Risk of COPD?

Nurses trying to prevent infection of hospital patients could be putting themselves at risk of developing chronic lung disease, a new study warns.

The cleaners and disinfectants used to sterilize medical equipment and wash hospital surfaces appear to increase nurses' odds of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to findings published online Oct. 18 in J...

Nurse Practitioners Often Restricted From Prescribing Opioid Treatments

In a finding that suggests that not all weapons are being deployed in the opioid war, new research shows that nurse practitioners often face tough restrictions for prescribing a medication that treats opioid addiction.

At least six states with high opioid addiction rates have rules that restrict nurse practitioners (NPs) in prescribing buprenorphine to treat opioid-addicted patients, ...

Nurses' Long Hours, Moonlighting Could Pose Patient Safety Risk

Many new nurses work long hours, put in overtime and hold down second jobs, all factors that could jeopardize patient safety and their own well-being, a new study suggests.

A number of forces have affected nurses and the hours they work in recent years. They include introduction of the Affordable Care Act and increased access to health care, as well as the 2008 recession, which delaye...

Disrupted Sleep Plagues Hospital Patients, But New Program Might Help

Anyone who has cared for a hospitalized loved one knows that frequent nighttime sleep interruptions -- caused by noise or nursing checks -- are a big concern.

But in a new study, a Chicago hospital adopted sleep-friendly measures for patients that led to fewer nighttime awakenings without compromising care.

Nighttime room entries dropped by 44 percent after researchers educ...

Better Economy Could Mean Worse Nursing Home Care

In a good economy, the care at U.S. nursing homes falls because it's harder to attract and keep staff, a new study contends.

"During economic downturns, many people are willing to take positions with work environments they may not prefer because there aren't many options," said principal investigator Sean Shenghsiu Huang.

"But when the economy is good, there are plenty of ...

Doctor Not Available for Diabetes Care? Nurse Practitioners Do Just as Well

There are many areas of the United States where doctors are in short supply, but the good news for diabetics is that nurse practitioners and physician assistants can often help fill that care gap.

In fact, new research compared the care given by doctors, nurse practitioners and physician assistants to people with diabetes and found no significant differences in care.

"There ...

ER Nurses Might Do Better 'Eyeballing' Patients

"Eyeballing" emergency room patients may be better than a formal medical assessment in identifying those most in need of urgent care, a new study suggests.

Nearly 6,400 patients seeking ER care were assessed over three months. Nurses used an established triage protocol to determine which patients were the sickest, while medical students and phlebotomists (blood collection specialists)...

Barriers to Doctor-Nurse Communications Thwart Care

A "power gap" between doctors and nurses contributes to poor communication that puts hospital patients at risk, a new study contends.

To learn more about communication breakdowns between the two groups, researchers recorded doctor-nurse interactions at the University of Michigan Health System. Doctors and nurses were then asked to critique the videos together.

Hospital hier...